Elections New Brunswick, Canada

Candidates MUN


I work for the municipality, can I be a candidate for mayor or councillor?
In municipal elections, do I have to resign as a mayor or councillor of a municipality or rural community in order to run as a candidate?
When does my 'job' as councillor end prior to the next quadrennial election (in other words, how long does the current municipal council sit until the new council is elected)?
How can I get more information about what I will do if I win the election for mayor or councillor?
Can I work for a Regional Service Commission and be the mayor of a municipality or rural community at the same time?

Q.  I work for the municipality, can I be a candidate for mayor or councillor?

A.  A municipal or rural community official or a full-time employee of a municipality or rural community cannot be a candidate in that municipality or community.

A judge, an election officer, or a person who has been disqualified for municipal office under federal, provincial, or municipal election laws, may not be a candidate anywhere.



Q.  In municipal elections, do I have to resign as a mayor or councillor of a municipality or rural community in order to run as a candidate?

A.  In quadrennial municipal elections, current mayors or councillors do not need to resign their office as a member of council to run in the election, either to reoffer as a candidate for their current office or to run for a different office.

In a municipal by-election, before a member of a council may file nomination papers for any other office of council, he or she must resign his or her office as a member not less than the Friday, twenty-one days before the day fixed for the close of nominations. He or she must immediately send notice of the resignation to the Municipal Electoral Officer.



Q.  When does my 'job' as councillor end prior to the next quadrennial election (in other words, how long does the current municipal council sit until the new council is elected)?

A.  A council of a municipality or rural community continues until the first meeting of the incoming council after a quadrennial election.

Section 39 of the Municipalities Act addresses the tenure of council and what a council shall and, more specifically, what it shall not do during the period commencing on the day of a quadrennial election and ending on the day of the first meeting of the incoming council.

For more information, please visit the Local Government Resource Manual (Section 2 – The Local Government Election Process).



Q.  How can I get more information about what I will do if I win the election for mayor or councillor?

A.  For information on the role of municipal or rural community councils, contact your local municipal office, or the Local and Regional Governance Branch of the Department of Environment and Local Government, at 506-444-4423. For more information, please visit the Local Government Resource Manual.



Q.  Can I work for a Regional Service Commission and be the mayor of a municipality or rural community at the same time?

A.  No, the mayor of a municipality or rural community cannot be employed by the regional service commission that serves his or her municipality or rural community.